Building Bridges to Support Individuals with FASD

7:30 PM – 8:30 PM
Wednesday, May 20, 2015
Rm. 3113, Child and Family Research Institute
950 West 28th Avenue, Vancouver, BC

FREE ADMISSION – Everyone is welcome!

Featured speakers:
Dr. James Reynolds, Professor, Queen’s University
Dr. Amy Salmon, Executive Director, CanFASD
Dr. Nina Di Pietro, Research Associate, National Core for Neuroethics, UBC

This forum aims to give communities and individuals affected by FASD an opportunity to hear from researchers and health science experts about the latest developments in FASD diagnosis and treatment, with a focus on challenges and opportunities for improving access to supports and services.

For more information, please visit www.neuroethicscanada.ca.

FASD Community Forum

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Opening Night: CBS Kelowna

“Holding space for possibilities in a time of uncertainty” – Carole Robinson, on her definition of hope.

Carole Robinson, from UBC Okanagan, gave the plenary talk last night to open the conference. She approached end-of-life issues from a relational ethics perspective. In particular, she concentrated on emphasizing the need conversations with families around advanced care planning. Robinson’s take on relational ethics was inclusive of both individualistic perspectives on autonomy and decision-making, in addition to relational views which emphasize human relationships as being crucial. For example, Robinson advised shifting the question from “what do you want” to “if you can’t speak for yourself, how would you guide your family to speak for you”? This question would thus open up the ethical space for a larger conversation that enables dialogue around options for care. This may include, for example, what would a do not resuscitate order (DNR) look like, and how successful a DNR would likely be. Robinson reported that most conceptions of interventions such as DNR come from popular medical television dramas which sensationalize high success rates. Although much of Robinson’s presentation has been an important topic of discussion for many years, her plenary was a call to action for medical professionals to begin the advanced care planning conversation with their patients and families.

Today, Thursday June 10, we look forward to the plenary session on child and youth welfare, and concurrent sessions on clinical equipoise, the ‘hidden curriculum’ in post-graduate ethics training for psychiatry residents, end-of-life issues, and autonomy and decision-making in plastic surgery.

Blogging Canadian Bioethics: Kelowna 2010

The 21st Annual Canadian Bioethics Society Conference will be taking place this year in Kelowna, British Columbia from June 9th – 12th. The theme of this year’s conference is “Voices of Communities”.

Like last year, I will be blogging live from the conference. However this year I won’t go at it alone, as I’ve managed to coerce a few other UBC Neuroethics folk to contribute to conference blog posts. These include Joanne Reimer and Elana Brief, who both will be presenting papers. Joanne will be discussing her study, Spinal Cord Injury and the Clinical Translation of Stem Cells: Stakeholder Perspectives, June 11 at 10:30 am. Elana will be presenting Protecting or Silencing: The Benefits and Harms of Community Anonymity, the same afternoon at 2:00 pm. Check the official program for room designations. Research Coordinator Emily Borgelt will also post her reflections on sessions during the conference.

For those interested, the Canadian Neuroethics Interest Group will be held Friday, June 12th at 7:30 am in the Selkirk room. Yes. That is a.m. as in ante meridiem as in morning. Early morning. See you there!

Conference Webpage: http://en.cbskelowna2010.ca/

Image source: CBS Kelowna