About Marianne Claire Bacani

Marianne Claire Bacani is an Events Director for Neuroethics Canada at the University of British Columbia.

Community Conversations: The Ethics of Medical Cannabis for Children in an Unregulated World

Wednesday, June 23, 2021
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM PDT
Register here for the Zoom details: https://emccuw.eventbrite.ca

Join us for an interactive conversation with experts on the topic of ethics and medical cannabis for children and youth in health care. The dialogue will take place both through live engagement with the public and pre-submitted questions.

We want to hear your views!

Moderators:
Hal Siden, MD, MHSc

Medical Director, Division Head and Investigator,
BC Children’s Hospital
Canuck Place Children’s Hospice
Clinical Professor, University of British Columbia

Judy Illes, CM, PhD
Director, Neuroethics Canada
Professor of Neurology, University of British Columbia

If you have a question for the moderators, you may submit it to info.neuroethics@ubc.ca prior to the event.

A Two-Component Ethics Approach for Triage to Epilepsy Monitoring Units

Jason Randhawa, MD
Neuroethics Canada Blog


Electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring provides critical diagnostic and management information about patients with epilepsy and seizure mimics. Admission to an epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) is the gold standard for such monitoring in major medical facilities worldwide. In many countries, however, access is challenged by limited resources compared to need. Triaging EMU admission in these circumstances is generally approached by unwritten protocols that vary by institution. In the absence of explicit guidance, decisions can be ethically taxing and are easy to dispute.

Drawing upon the limited triage literature from neurology and then moreso from various areas of medicine more broadly, my mentors and I developed an ethically-grounded two-component approach to EMU triage (Randhawa et al., under revision, 2021). The strategic component identifies three targets to guide improvements in EMU wait list infrastructure at the institutional level: (1) accountability to patients and public to foster transparency, (2) engagement of clinicians and administrators to achieve process improvements, and (3) empowerment of waitlist managers to promote active waitlist management strategies (see Figure).

The principled component applies an essential balance of three key moral philosophies to triage at the patient level. First, prioritarianism promotes the needs of the most ill, defined by seizure frequency and severity; however, it may also include subjective measures such as suffering. Second, utilitarianism maximizes the overall utility of resources, promoting the greatest benefits for the most people. If patients are having frequent seizures, they are more likely to benefit from EMU evaluation (utility) and are considered sicker (priority); therefore, these first two ethics principles work together. The principle of justice promotes equality by considering other relevant contextual factors such as patient’s ability to self-advocate and length of wait. This principle provides further refinement to the triage process. For example, patients who are disabled by frequent seizures may be unable to advocate for themselves to obtain a sooner admission despite the high utility and priority. As such, justice provides further impetus for accelerated admission.

These principles will be weighted differently depending on several contextual factors, such as the availability of adequate resources: high-resource settings favor prioritarianism; low-resource settings favor utilitarianism. Other factors affecting the use of these principles include patient and public values, clinician preferences, and objective metrics available to guide these decisions.

The approach we propose can inform site-specific process improvements and further revisions based on data generated at individual institutions. While much work remains to be done to explore and test implementation of the model, it provides a starting point in transforming implicit thinking about ethically-fraught circumstances related to EMUs into explicitly principled ones.

Acknowledgements to my research mentors Drs. Chantelle Hrazdil, Patrick McDonald, and Judy Illes for their substantial contributions. This work was supported in part by the UBC Faculty of Medicine, Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute, and NIH/NIMH #RF1#MH117805 01.


Jason Randhawa, MD, is a Neurology Resident Research Assistant at Neuroethics Canada. He is a senior neurology resident based out of Vancouver General Hospital and St. Paul’s Hospital at the University of British Columbia.

Hacking the mind: How technology is changing the way we view our brain and ourselves

Dr. Nir Lipsman (Assistant Professor, Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto) presented “Hacking the mind: How technology is changing the way we view our brain and ourselves” at the 2021 Brain Awareness Week – Annual Distinguished Neuroethics Lecture, held on March 16, 2021.

Overview:
As it advances, our relationship with brain technology will change. In this lecture, Dr. Nir Lipsman will discuss how our knowledge of brain circuitry, and how it can go wrong, has informed our understanding of human behaviour. We will then discuss the implications of more sophisticated, precise and less intrusive brain technology, on that relationship, and what it could all mean for the next generation of brain therapy and beyond…

Bio:
Nir Lipsman MD, PhD, FRCSC, is a neurosurgeon and scientist at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and an Assistant Professor of Surgery at the University of Toronto. He completed his undergraduate degree at the University of Toronto followed by a medical degree at Queen’s University, and a neurosurgical residency at the University of Toronto. During his residency, Dr. Lipsman completed his PhD investigating novel neuromodulation strategies in patients with treatment-resistant psychiatric and neurologic conditions. He is currently the Director of Sunnybrook’s Harquail Center for Neuromodulation, and the Clinical Director of Sunnybrook’s Focused Ultrasound Centre of Excellence.

Dr. Lipsman has helped develop several clinical trials of MR-guided focused ultrasound (FUS) in novel indications, including among the world’s first experience of FUS in essential tremor, obsessive-compulsive disorder, major depression and chronic pain, as well as the first randomized control trial of FUS in tremor. He has led the world’s first application of FUS-mediated blood brain barrier (BBB) opening in Alzheimer’s Disease, and helped develop the first applications in primary and secondary brain tumors and ALS. He has published over 100 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters, including in The Lancet, Lancet Neurology, Lancet Psychiatry, New England Journal of Medicine, and Neuron.

Dr. Lipsman also has a strong interest in the broader clinical and ethical implications of neuromodulation, and has been closely involved in the development of international guidelines for the use of surgery in psychiatric disease. In collaboration with Drs. Judy Illes and Pat McDonald at UBC, he helped found the Pan Canadian Neurotechnology Ethics Consortium (PCNEC), bringing together experts in neuromodulation and ethics, to identify and tackle the most pressing ethical questions in the field.

Why neurosurgeons should care about ethics and why ethicists should care about neurosurgery

At the most recent Neuroethics Canada Seminar Series, Dr. Nir Lipsman discussed why neurosurgeons should care about ethics and why ethicists should care about neurosurgery.

Bio:
Nir Lipsman, MD, PhD, FRCSC is a neurosurgeon and scientist at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and an Assistant Professor of Surgery at the University of Toronto. He completed his undergraduate degree at the University of Toronto followed by a medical degree at Queen’s University, and a neurosurgical residency at the University of Toronto. During his residency, Dr. Lipsman completed his PhD investigating novel neuromodulation strategies in patients with treatment-resistant psychiatric and neurologic conditions. He is currently the Director of Sunnybrook’s Harquail Center for Neuromodulation, and the Clinical Director of Sunnybrook’s Focused Ultrasound Centre of Excellence.

2021 Brain Awareness Week Annual Distinguished Neuroethics Lecture

Hacking the Mind: How Technology Is Changing The Way We View Our Brain and Ourselves
Nir Lipsman, MD, PhD, FRCSC, Assistant Professor, Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto

Tuesday, March 16, 2021
4:00 PM – 5:00 PM PDT
For the Zoom details, please RSVP here: https://baw2021.eventbrite.ca

Overview:
As it advances, our relationship with brain technology will change. In this lecture, Dr. Nir Lipsman will discuss how our knowledge of brain circuitry, and how it can go wrong, has informed our understanding of human behaviour. We will then discuss the implications of more sophisticated, precise and less intrusive brain technology, on that relationship, and what it could all mean for the next generation of brain therapy and beyond…

Nir Lipsman MD, PhD, FRCSC
Dr. Nir Lipsman is a neurosurgeon and scientist at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and an Assistant Professor of Surgery at the University of Toronto. He completed his undergraduate degree at the University of Toronto followed by a medical degree at Queen’s University, and a neurosurgical residency at the University of Toronto. During his residency, Dr. Lipsman completed his PhD investigating novel neuromodulation strategies in patients with treatment-resistant psychiatric and neurologic conditions. He is currently the Director of Sunnybrook’s Harquail Center for Neuromodulation, and the Clinical Director of Sunnybrook’s Focused Ultrasound Centre of Excellence.

Dr. Lipsman has helped develop several clinical trials of MR-guided focused ultrasound (FUS) in novel indications, including among the world’s first experience of FUS in essential tremor, obsessive-compulsive disorder, major depression and chronic pain, as well as the first randomized control trial of FUS in tremor. He has led the world’s first application of FUS-mediated blood brain barrier (BBB) opening in Alzheimer’s Disease, and helped develop the first applications in primary and secondary brain tumors and ALS. He has published over 100 peer-reviewed papers and book chapters, including in The Lancet, Lancet Neurology, Lancet Psychiatry, New England Journal of Medicine, and Neuron.

Dr. Lipsman also has a strong interest in the broader clinical and ethical implications of neuromodulation, and has been closely involved in the development of international guidelines for the use of surgery in psychiatric disease. In collaboration with Drs. Judy Illes and Pat McDonald at UBC, he helped found the Pan Canadian Neurotechnology Ethics Consortium (PCNEC), bringing together experts in neuromodulation and ethics, to identify and tackle the most pressing ethical questions in the field.

Wicked Health Challenge Dialogues: COVID19 Edition – What lies ahead?

The Morris J. Wosk Centre for Dialogue and Neuroethics Canada are pleased to invite you to

WICKED HEALTH CHALLENGE DIALOGUES
COVID19 Edition: What lies ahead?

Tuesday, June 2, 2020
1:00 PM – 2:30 PM
Register here: https://bit.ly/2X4wm1y

Are you wondering what response and recovery looks like for a pandemic? How complex are the problems that lie ahead, and why does that matter?

Join us over Zoom as we discuss what response and recovery of our collective health and wellness looks like for COVID-19. We hope to deepen our collective understanding of the complexity of this challenge and consider what that means for collective action.

FEATURING:
Dr. Judy Illes
Professor and Director, Neuroethics Canada
University of British Columbia

Dr. Bruce Y. Lee
Professor, Health Policy & Management
City University of New York

Mr. Donald MacPherson
Director, Canadian Drug Policy Coalition
Simon Fraser University

Dr. Farah N. Mawani
Post-doctoral Fellow, MAP Centre for Urban Health Solutions
St. Michael’s Hospital, Toronto

MODERATED BY:
Dr. Diane T. Finegood
Professor and Fellow, Morris J. Wosk Centre for Dialogue
Simon Fraser University

“Modulating the Mind” – Dr. Judy Illes at TEDx Abbotsford

Neuroethics Canada’s Dr. Judy Illes was invited to speak at the TEDx Abbotsford in November 2019.

We are pleased to share that you may now watch her presentation!

In her TEDx talk, Dr. Illes discussed how how people think about brain surgery for neurologic and psychiatric conditions, including ethical concerns about hope versus hype, rights, justice, agency, and personal privacy.

 

The Importance of Global Co-operation: A Statement on COVID-19 from Neuroethics Canada

Featured

Faculty and members of the Advisory Board of Neuroethics Canada, a group of distinguished neuroscientists, ethicists, and community leaders, stand together in this time of COVID-19 to emphasize the importance of global cooperation.

While the closure of physical borders is a necessary means to curtail the spread of the coronavirus, intellectual borders must remain open to international collaboration among scientists and society to reverse the fragmentation caused by the pandemic.

It is through worldwide cooperation that stigma and discrimination will be suppressed, cures discovered, and preventive measures to new threats implemented for a safer future for all people.

NeuroethicsCanada COVID19 Statement nws

2020 Brain Awareness Week Annual Distinguished Neuroethics Lecture: Hacking the Mind

The 2020 Brain Awareness Week Annual Distinguished Neuroethics Lecture “Hacking the Mind: How Technology Is Changing The Way We View Our Brain and Ourselves” has been postponed due to the continuing threat of the coronavirus.

Please stay tuned here for news of a new date.

Hacking the Mind: How Technology Is Changing The Way We View Our Brain and Ourselves
Nir Lipsman, MD, PhD, FRCSC, Assistant Professor, Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, University of Toronto

Monday, March 16, 2020
5:30 PM – 7:00 PM
C300 Theatre, UBC Robson Square
800 Robson Street, Vancouver, BC, V6Z 3B7
(map)

Overview:
As it advances, our relationship with brain technology will change. In this lecture, Dr. Nir Lipsman will discuss how our knowledge of brain circuitry, and how it can go wrong, has informed our understanding of human behaviour. We will then discuss the implications of more sophisticated, precise and less intrusive brain technology, on that relationship, and what it could all mean for the next generation of brain therapy and beyond…

Nir Lipsman, MD, PhD, FRCSC
Nir Lipsman, MD, PhD, FRCSC is a neurosurgeon and scientist at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre and an Assistant Professor of Surgery at the University of Toronto. He completed his undergraduate degree at the University of Toronto followed by a medical degree at Queen’s University, and a neurosurgical residency at the University of Toronto. During his residency, Dr. Lipsman completed his PhD investigating novel neuromodulation strategies in patients with treatment-resistant psychiatric and neurologic conditions. He is currently the Director of Sunnybrook’s Harquail Center for Neuromodulation, and the Clinical Director of Sunnybrook’s Focused Ultrasound Centre of Excellence.

 

Gene Editing: A silver bullet or a tool for eugenics?

Neuroethics Canada and the Morris J. Wosk Centre for Dialogue are pleased to invite you to

WICKED HEALTH CHALLENGE DIALOGUES
Gene Editing: A silver bullet or a tool for eugenics?

Thursday, January 23, 2020
4:30 PM – 6:30 PM
Jack P. Blaney Asia Pacific Hall, Morris J. Wosk Centre for Dialogue
580 W. Hastings St, Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3
(map)

Come join us for an interesting and exciting dialogue to deepen our understanding of the complexity of this challenge and to surface ideas for action!

FEATURING:
Tania Bubela, JD, PhD
Dean and Professor
Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University

Andre Picard
Health Reporter and Columnist
Globe and Mail

Alice Virani, PhD
Clinical Assistant Professor
Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia

Wyeth Wasserman, PhD
Vice-President Research
BC Children’s Hospital, Provincial Health Services Authority

MODERATED BY:
Diane T. Finegood, PhD
Professor and Fellow
Morris J. Wosk Centre for Dialogue, Simon Fraser University

Judy Illes, CM, PhD
Professor and Director
Neuroethics Canada, University of British Columbia

Neuroethics Canada Morris J Wosk Centre for Dialogue

 

Gene Editing (11x17) WEB

Click here to view the event’s graphic recording in a higher-resolution.