Day 3: Better belated than never.

Although the conference came to a close on Saturday afternoon, there were several sessions we didn’t report on, which included summaries of Joanne Reimer’s talk from Friday and the closing panel presentation on Saturday. Below you can find Joanne’s summary of both her presentation, and the final panel:

Spinal Cord Injury and the Clinical Translation of Stem Cells:  Stakeholder Perspectives – Joanne Reimer, National Core for Neuroethics, UBC

On Friday, June 11, I had the opportunity to present on our research study on stakeholder perspectives regarding the clincal translation of stem cell therapy for spinal cord injury.  The presentation enabled a discussion about how primary stakeholders – people living with spinal cord injury and various health care providers – balance risks and benefits of potential stem cell therapy and how their perspectives may not align with scientific targets for clinical trials. This prompted discussion about  how primary stakeholders can inform science as science progresses to clinical trials.

Panel Presentation – “Responding to Voices”

On Saturday, June 12, the conference concluded with a Panel Presentation – Responding to Voices.  The four panelists (who’s names unfortunately escape us at the moment, and the names were not included in the program), all work for Interior Health (the regional health authority), and included a family nurse practioner, an aboriginal outreach worker, Chief, a nursing professional practice leader, and a family physician working in emergency and long term care.  The panelists offered their personal perspectives on care situations they were involved in and the ethical struggles they encountered.   Collectively, the participants’ case examples illustrated the systemic culture of “not hearing” on a personal, professional, and organizational level and the consequences of that on patients, families, and themselves as health care providers.  Their stories resonated with the audience who commended the panelists for sharing their vulnerability, humility and compassion.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s